Hold On!

Hold Up

Please select a minimum of three sectors in the menu above.

Got It
  • Japanese funerals get less traditional
  • Japanese funerals get less traditional
    Takasuii (2015) ©
SIGNAL

Japanese funerals get less traditional

In Japan, despite it being a mostly secular country, the vast majority of funerals are Buddhist. But an increasing number of people are opting for ‘freestyle funerals’, where the preferences of the deceased and their family are dictating the ceremony, rather than tradition or religious custom.

Canvas8

Related

  • Japanese people visit phone booth to speak to the dead Japanese people visit phone booth to speak to the dead

    Every culture has rituals that can help people in mourning, but sometimes tragedy occurs on such a large scale that the old customs don’t cut it. In Japan, over 10,000 people have visited a phone booth in the town of Otsuchi, where they can ‘talk to’ loved ones killed in the 2011 earthquake.

  • Article image Who are Japan’s Gen Y worshippers?

    Blessing ceremonies? Power stones? Cultivating one’s ki energy? Gen Yers in Japan aren't just embracing these things – a growing number are spending on them, too. Amid economic turmoil and rampant Americanisation, young Japan is turning to religion for both their personal and national identities.

  • Article image You’re killing me! The science of mortality

    It’s a fact; we’re getting old. By 2020, over-60s will outnumber under-5s for the first time. And as death looms, our fear of it does, too. Linda Court Salisbury and Gergana Y. Nenkov sit down with Canvas8 to explain how considering our own mortality can affect decision making in later life.

  • Death businesses thriving in Japan Death businesses thriving in Japan

    Death might be a subject avoided in many cultures, but in Japan the attitude toward to the inevitable termination of life is open, honest and frank. So much so, in fact, that coffin-trying services and other ‘death businesses’ in the country  known as shukatsu  are thriving.